2008 Top Ten Report

YPA released its latest report, “Top Ten Best Preservation Opportunities in the Pittsburgh Area.”  The report highlights historic properties in the Pittsburgh region that are good candidates for preservation and reuse.  The Top Ten report is released annually.  This is the sixth edition.

Read the report here:

2008 Top Ten Report

How the sites are selected

YPA receives nominations from the public and then scores them according to five criteria: 1) is it 50 years old or older? 2) historic and architectural significance; 3) threats to the site; 4) community input; and 5) feasibility of the solution.  YPA places more emphasis on criteria 4 and 5.  YPA also adds bonus points for sites located outside of the City of Pittsburgh, located outside Allegheny County, and sites that are in low- and moderate-income or minority communities.

YPA seeks nominations to its 2009 list.  Nominations are due on March 20, 2009.  Download a nomination form here:

2009 Top Ten Nomination Form

YPA Meets With National Secretary of the National Negro Opera Company


Barbara Edwards Lee with YPA admirersYPA CEO, Dan Holland, along with interns John Burgess, a Coro Fellow, and Dawn Webb Turner, today met with the former National Secretary of the National Negro Opera Company, Barbara Edwards Lee.  The NNOC, founded in 1941 by Mary Cardwell Dawson, was a nationally-renowned black opera company.  Their first headquarters was at 7101 Apple Street, in Pittsburgh’s Lincoln-Lemington/Homewood neighborhood.   Ms. Lee was Dawson’s niece and served as the National Secretary for the company, which traveled all over the United States.  “Madame” Mary Cardwell Dawson, as she was known, taught a number of nationally-famous musicians, including Ahmad Jamal and Robert McFerrin, Sr. (the father of Bobby McFerrin).  Her National Negro Opera Company was the first all-black opera company in the United States.  The company folded in 1962, upon the death of Ms. Dawson.   The house at 7101 Apple Street is now a protected City of Pittsburgh historic landmark, thanks to the efforts of the Young Preservationists Association.  YPA also re-dedicated a PHMC historical marker outside the house, which had been ripped down in early 2007.